Licking County Municipal Courtroom
Licking County Municipal Court

                                                                                      Adult Probation Department

                                                      History of the Probation Department

Back in 1996 the Licking County Municipal Court employed two Probation Officers. One officer worked for Judge Michael Higgins and the other officer worked for Judge Thomas Marcelain. Each judge would assign probation cases to his Probation Officer. There was one secretarial staff person who served as a support person to each Probation Officer.

            Judge Higgins and Judge Marcelain recognized that this type of a probation operation was not the most effective way of supervising defendants, so with the endorsement of the City of Newark and Licking County they decided to consolidate both officers to make up one probation department. The major benefits of restructuring were:

  • One department would handle all Municipal Court Probation cases.

  • One department would allow for more efficient administration.

  • One department would allow for more effective operations.

Considering all factors Judge Higgins and Judge Marcelain decided to move forward with the creation of the Licking County Municipal Court Adult Probation Department. On April 15, 1996 Emmett R. Barrett was sworn in as the first Director of the newly created probation department. Mr. Barrett served as Director from April 15, 1996 to September 26, 2000. On October 2, 2000 Scott F. Fulton was sworn in as the second Director of the probation department. Mr. Futon served as Director from October 2, 2000 to July 30, 2014. On August 18, 2014 Kevin K. Saad was sworn in as the third Director of the probation department. Mr. Saad still serves the court in that capacity.

 

                                                                     Mission Statement

The Licking County Municipal Court Adult Probation Department is dedicated to protecting the community by ensuring that defendants placed under supervision are monitored appropriately according to their risk level. The department is also dedicated to changing offender behavior and reducing crime by identifying criminogenic needs, formulating case plans to address said needs, and referring to evidence based programs.

 

                                                                  Goals

The goals of the Licking County Municipal Court Adult Probation Department are:

  • To be financially responsibly with city, county, and grant funds.

  • To collaborate with local community social services agencies for the purpose of developing and/or implementing evidence based programs for defendants.   

  •  To support/assist victims of crime specifically those victimized by a defendant sentenced by a Licking County Municipal Court Judge.

  • To support/assist the court with investigations, recommendations, record checks, security, and anything else deemed appropriate by the court.

  • To enforce all conditions of probation ordered by the court.

  • To support/assist defendants in their quest to change their behaviors by determining the appropriate intervention.  

                       Units of Supervision 

The engine that runs the supervision system is the ORAS Assessor Unit. ORAS stands for the Ohio Risk Assessment System. Within ORAS there are several assessment tools which help determine the risk level of defendants. Individual tools utilized by the Probation Department are Community Supervision Screening Tool (CSST), Community Supervision Tool (CST), Misdemeanor Screening Tool (MST), and Misdemeanor Assessment Tool (MAT). There is one officer assigned to this unit. The main duty of this officer is to complete ORAS assessment tools with defendants, score the tools, and transfer defendants to the appropriate units of supervision. This officer has four units to choose from when transferring cases (i.e., General Unit, Intensive Supervision Unit, Specialized Docket Intensive Supervision Unit, and Clerical Unit). These four units along with Pre-Trial Diversion and Intervention In Lieu of Conviction will be described in detail below:

General Unit: Within the General Unit defendants will have a risk score of low to moderate. A typical offense for this unit would be OVI, Theft, Disorderly Conduct, or an offense of violence (i.e., Domestic Violence or Assault). An ideal caseload size for this unit would be 200 cases per officer. There are two probation officers assigned to this unit. The primary duties of these officers are:

  • Case planning (i.e., setting goals and objectives based on criminogenic risk factors).

  • Analyzing assessment data to determine need areas.

  • Managing both reporting and non-reporting cases.

  • Conducting home contacts.

  • Verifying employment, treatment, Alcoholics/Narcotics Anonymous, and/or community service.

  • Conducting a cost benefit analysis with moderate risk defendants.

  • Conducting behavioral chains with moderate risk defendants.

  • Conducting Texas Christian University Drug Screen V assessments on moderate risk defendants. This is a tool that helps Probation Officers to determine if a defendant has a mild, moderate, or severe alcohol or other drug disorder.

  • Enforce all terms and conditions ordered by the court.

  • Complete and file motion and memorandum for oral hearings.

  • Complete various reports for the court.

  • Complete alcohol and/or drug tests.

  • Provide security to the court when needed.

  • Attend probation revocation hearings.

  • Enter data into the probation software system.

  • Keep statistical data on defendants.

  • Sanction defendants for inappropriate behavior.

  • Close cases.

Intensive Supervision Unit: Within the Intensive Supervision Unit defendants will have a risk score of high to very high. Defendants placed in this unit will most likely be multiple offenders who will have many criminogenic need areas. Typical offenses would be the same as the General Unit, but the defendants would most likely have multiple offenses on their records. An ideal caseload size for this unit would be 65 cases per officer. There is one probation officer assigned to this unit. The primary duties of this officer are the same duties as a General Unit officer with the following additions:

  • Interview incarcerated defendants at the local jail.

  • Conduct scheduled home contacts at least two times per month.

  • Adhere to all Bureau of Community Sanctions audit standards (This is an Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction grant funded position).

  • More frequent office contacts due to the defendants being high risk.

  • Conducting a cost benefit analysis and/or a behavior chain on all defendants.

  • Distribute star cards and incentives for doing well.

  • Monitor SCRAM violations (Continuous alcohol monitoring).

Specialized Docket Intensive Supervision Unit: Within this unit defendants will have a risk score of high to very high. There are two specialized dockets within this unit.

The LIFT Court Specialized Docket targets individuals who are of high risk and high needs with limited means that need a lift in their lives in order to address their drug and alcohol addiction and/or mental health. The LIFT Court offers a participant a way to have a different kind of life, a life of freedom from drugs and/or alcohol, and a life with the prospect of hope and promise. Participants are expected to adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Abstain from alcohol and drug use.

  • Attend status review hearings.

  • Attend appointments with treatment providers and/or case managers.

  • Attend appointments with coordinator/probation officer.

  • Comply with program requirements.

  • Submit to frequent, random, and observed alcohol and drug screens.

  • Comply with sanctions for infractions.

  • Obtain/maintain employment.

  • Obtain GED if applicable.

  • Secure stable housing.

  • Engage in sober support community (i.e., AA, NA, and AL-ANON).

  • No further violations of law.

 Judge David Stansbury presides over the LIFT Court Docket. This court has been certified by the Ohio Supreme Court. One probation officer is assigned to this court. Typical offenses for this court would be the same as the regular intensive supervision unit. An ideal caseload size for this court would be 35 cases. The primary duties of this officer would be all the same duties as a general or regular intensive supervision officer. Additional duties of this officer are:

  • Attending LIFT Court sessions weekly with the judge and with the defendants.

  • Prepare LIFT Court progress reports for the judge.

  • Attend weekly treatment team meetings.

  • Maintains daily operations of the LIFT Court.

  • Meets with any potential participants upon referral.

  • Visits participants at school or other locations.

  • Provide information to the treatment team.

  • Participates in discussions about incentives, sanctions, phase advancement, graduation, and termination.

The other court within this unit is the OVI Specialized Docket Court. This court targets repeat misdemeanor OVI offenders who meet the following criteria:

  • 2nd or 3rd OVI conviction within six years.

  • 1st offense conviction within six years with prior lifetime OVI convictions.

  • Must be a Licking County resident or an out of county resident if the person has financial resources to cover treatment costs.

  • Moderate to severe alcohol problems with a diagnosis of alcohol dependence.

The OVI Specialized Docket Court offers a participant effective supervision with enhanced treatment services. Participants are expected to adhere to the following guidelines:

  • No alcohol consumption or illegal drug use.

  • Stay out of bars and any business which makes most of their money from selling alcohol.

  • Frequent, random, and observed toxicology screens.

  • SCRAM alcohol monitoring (This is continuous alcohol monitoring).

  • Substance abuse treatment at the Licking County Alcohol Prevention Program. Other counseling as determined as necessary.

  • Obtain GED or high school diploma.

  • Maintain lawful employment.

  • Vocational/educational training if necessary.

  • Restitution if necessary.

  • Pay fines and court costs.

  • Complete physical examination.

  • Reporting to probation and court as directed by phases or as court determines.

  • Electronic Monitoring if necessary.

  • Wear Remote Breath Device if necessary.

Judge Michael Higgins presides over the OVI Specialized Docket Court. This court has been certified by the Ohio Supreme Court. One officer is assigned to this court. Typical offenses for this court would be multiple OVI’s. Ideal caseload size for this court would be 35 cases. The primary duties of this officer are all of the duties of the general and regular intensive supervision unit and some of the duties of the LIFT Court. Additional duties of this officer are:

  • Conducts the legal eligibility screening.

  • Assists the participant in all phases including the orientation phase.

  • Monitors compliance with supervision plan.

  • Assists with transportation, housing, education, employment, obtaining medical care, family issues, training, and applying for government assistance.

  • Makes referrals to other agencies.

  • Monitors mental health medication compliance.

Pre-Trial Diversion/Intervention In Lieu of conviction/Clerical Unit: Defendants are usually low risk if placed in the Diversion program. Typical offenses for potential Diversion participants would be Underage Consumption or Theft. An ideal caseload size for Diversion would be 250 cases per officer. The Diversion program consists of a maximum probationary period of one year. Two officers are assigned to handle Diversion cases. Potential participant guidelines for this program are as follows:

  • A person’s criminal/traffic arrest record will be reviewed by probation staff to determine whether the person is a first time offender as defined by Ohio Revised Code and tentatively eligible to participate in the Diversion program. The eligibility criteria are set forth in Revised Code Section 2935.56.

  • A person may not have other criminal charges pending in any jurisdiction at the time of application and must not have previously participated in an adult Diversion program in any jurisdiction.

  • A person may also be disqualified from participation in the Diversion Program if the Prosecuting Attorney, at its discretion, determines that the offender is not amenable to the program and/or treatment, or the offender does not accept responsibility for his or her conduct.

If a person is tentatively accepted and is granted Diversion the following conditions could apply:

  • A participant would be required to pay a minimum court cost of $83.00 and a Diversion supervision fee of $150.00, as well as possible restitution to a victim if damages were caused by the offense, treatment costs, and/or fees associated with community service if so ordered.

  • A participant must complete a stipulation of admission, accepting responsibility for his or her criminal behavior.

  • A participant may be required to participate in an intensive or educational counseling program.

  • A participant may be required to refrain from using alcohol during the course of treatment.

  • A participant will be required to refrain from using any controlled substances, except those prescribed by a physician.

  • A participant may be required to refrain from contacting the victim in the case for a specified time period.

  • A participant will be required to obey all federal, state, and local laws during the course of the program.

  • A participant may be prohibited from possessing weapons during the period of the program.

  • A participant will be required to complete all requirements and conditions of the individual offender’s program agreement and attend all meetings, sessions, and appointments associated with rehabilitation efforts.

If a participant completes his or her program successfully, the court will dismiss the charges against the participant. The primary duties of these officers are to enforce the conditions listed above.

Intervention In Lieu of Conviction (ILC) also falls within this unit. Defendants could be low, moderate, or high if placed in the ILC program. Typical offenses are described in Ohio Revised Code Section 2951.041 (A) (1). The first part of this code section states, “If an offender is charged with a criminal offense, including but not limited to a violation of section 2913.02, 2913.03, 2913.11, 2913.21, 2913.31, or 2919.21 of the Revised Code, and the court has reason to believe that drug or alcohol usage by the offender was a factor leading to the criminal offense with which the offender is charged or that, at the time of committing that offense, the offender had a mental illness, was a person with intellectual disability, or was a victim of a violation of section 2905.32 of the Revised Code and that the mental illness, status as a person with intellectual disability, or fact that the offender was a victim of a violation of section 2905.32 of the Revised Code was a factor leading to the offender’s criminal behavior, the court may accept, prior to the entry of a guilty plea, the offender’s request for intervention in lieu of conviction.” Eligibility for ILC is described in Ohio Revised Code Section 2951.041 (B) (1-10). An ideal caseload size for ILC would be 50 cases.

If the court grants an offender’s request for ILC, the court shall place the offender under the general control of the probation department. The court shall establish an intervention plan for the offender. The terms and conditions of the intervention plan are as follows:

  • The plan will be at least one year from the date which the court granted the order of ILC.

  • To abstain from the use of illegal drugs or alcohol.

  • To participate in treatment and recovery support services.

  • To submit to regular random testing for drug and alcohol use.

  • To comply with other treatment if deemed appropriate.

  • To comply with any other terms and conditions similar to community control sanctions, which may include community service or restitution, that are ordered by the court.

One officer is assigned to supervise the ILC participants. The primary duties of this officer is to enforce the conditions listed above.

Finally, the clerical caseload falls within this unit. Defendants classified as clerical are considered low risk. The typical offense for this caseload is first time OVI’s. An ideal caseload size is 200 cases. One officer is assigned to this caseload. The primary duties of this officer are as follows:

  • Complete intake interviews.

  • Enforce conditions ordered by the court.

  • Verify driver intervention program participation.

  • Assist with driving privileges and driver’s license questions.

  • File motion and memorandum for oral hearings when necessary.

  • Close cases.

 

                   Staff

Kevin Saad, Director: 740-670-7837, ksaad@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Vanessa Stalnaker, Senior Probation Officer: 740-670-7838, vstalnaker@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Becky Moffett, Probation Officer II: 740-670-7833, bmoffett@lcmunicipalcourt.com

 Karrie Rice, Probation Officer I: 740-670-7824, krice@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Jordan Barnard, Probation Officer I: 740-670-7821, jbarnard@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Steven Crawmer Probation Officer I: 740-670-7828, scrawmer@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Samantha Thompson Probation Officer I: 740-670-7830, sthompson@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Hans Huy Probation Officer I: 740-670-7839, hhuy@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Carla Fowler Probation Officer I: 740-670-7829, cfowler@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Kenda Menter, Secretary II: 740-670-7831, kmenter@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Kathy Simons Secretary I: 740-670-7825, ksimons@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Toria Lovell Contract Hire Secretary: 740-670-7835, tlovell@lcmunicipalcourt.com

Tony Phillips Community Service Officer: 740-670-7827, tphillips@lcmunicipalcourt.com